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TEAM ACTIVITIES

  • February 22, 2016

TEAM Program - workshop

  • April 9, 2015

Testimony 1 from Sophalla

I don't know what I'll do without Lao Khmu help. Throughout the years I feel that they are like my second family and I can turn to them anytime. The person that has been helping me is like a second daughter to me. I feel like I'm a small person to the utility company and they can step all over me because I cannot read or write English. With Lao Khmu they treat me as an equal and they are very dedicated to what they do. They care about me and I feel a strong trust with them. I know that I am protected by the California Public Utility Commissioner (CPUC), through this agency. I don't know what I'll do without their help. All my kids are busy with their work and families of their own. Sometimes I feel like I'm all alone. However, I feel a sense of relief knowing that I can turn to Lao Khmu. I wouldn't know what to do if this agency wasn't around. I'm glad that the CPUC is on my side and they understand my concern. My life has been a struggle. I am a recovering cancer patient. I have lost sleep when the utility company overcharged me. I'm not able to work therefore I only have a fixed income. I just can't afford to pay more than I'm supposed to. Lao Khmu has helped me with my utility bills therefore I can sleep more soundly.

Testimony 2 from Phally

For many years, I had home phone service but had no idea that I was getting ripped off by the utility company. I should have listened, when someone from the department at Lao Khmu had asked me to bring in my bill. I would say yes, but never did. I thought this agency was just wasting my time and trying to get my money, I was wrong. They are very sincere about helping me, they actually helped me get some money back from the utility company. I am a single mother of two boys, life is already hard and the utility companies made it harder. They do not charge any fee for their services. Do yourself a favor service. Bring in your bill and Lao Khmu will make sure you are getting the best rates for your service.

2013 Annual Report

  • January 31, 2014

Population Served:

Number of clients served:

In accordance with contractual requirements (A-12-460), the Center for Employment Opportunity (CEO) served an average of 1,100 Welfare-to-Work (WTW) recipients daily during the period of January 1, 2013 to October 31, 2013 (i.e., 110 clients per each of 10 Case Managers). With the onset of a new contract on November 1, 2014 (A-13-312), the number of clients served daily during the remainder of CY 2013 rose to 1,430 (i.e., 110 clients per each of 13 Case Managers).

Since the length of participation averaged approximately 169.45 days, the Center experienced a large number of clients entering and exiting the program throughout the year. Specifically, 2,280 individuals were referred and 2,401 deregistered during CY 2013.

The monthly caseload flow can be summarized as follows:

Number of clients served by Case Manager:

Although CEO routinely experiences an unusually low rate of staff turnover, CY 2013 witnessed the loss of two line staff members, one for personal career advancement (TL) and the other as a result of the conclusion of a sub-contractual relationship with Lao Family of Stockton (CV). As a result, the agency replaced two positions and added an additional three employees with the advent of the new contract.

The incoming flow of cases by staff member can therefore be summarized as follows:

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2012 Annual Report

  • January 31, 2013

Total Population Served:

In accordance with contractual requirements (A-10-412), the Center for Employment Opportunity (CEO) served an average of 1,100 Welfare-to-Work (WTW) recipients daily during CY 2012 (i.e., 110 clients per each of 10 Case Managers). Since the length of participation averaged approximately 144.10 days, the Center experienced a large number of clients entering and exiting the program throughout the year. Specifically, 2,814 individuals were referred and 2,888 deregistered during CY 2012.

The monthly caseload flow can be summarized as follows:

Demographics of Clients:

CEO routinely monitors demographics of the clients at the time of referral in terms of five characteristics as verified by the County of San Joaquin: Family Size, Employment Status, Compliance Status, Ethnicity, and Language Preference. These characteristics can be summarized as follows:

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2011 Annual Report

  • January 31, 2012

Total Population Served:

In accordance with contractual requirements (A-10-412), the Center for Employment Opportunity (CEO) served an average of 1,100 Welfare-to-Work (WTW) recipients daily during CY 2011 (i.e., 110 clients per each of 10 Case Managers). Since the length of participation averaged approximately 156.04 days, the Center experienced a large number of clients entering and exiting the program throughout the year. Specifically, 2,573 individuals were referred and 2,559 deregistered during CY 2011.

The monthly caseload flow can be summarized as follows:

Demographics of Clients:

CEO routinely monitors demographics of the clients at the time of referral in terms of five characteristics as verified by the County of San Joaquin: Family Size, Employment Status, Compliance Status, Ethnicity, and Language Preference. These characteristics can be summarized as follows:

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2010 Annual Report

  • January 31, 2011

Total Population Served:

During the period of January to July 2010, the Center for Employment Opportunity (CEO) was contracted to serve 1,320 Welfare-to-Work (WTW) clients at any given time (i.e., 110 clients per each of 12 Case Managers). However, due to budgetary constraints with the County of San Joaquin, the agency was forced to lay off two Case Managers, effective July 31, 2011. Accordingly, CEO's daily caseload size was reduced to 1,100 clients during the period of August to December 2010 (i.e., 110 clients per each of ten Case Managers).

Since the length of participation averaged 148.7 days, the Center experienced a relatively large number of clients entering and exiting the program during the course of the year. Specifically, 1,882 individuals were referred to CEO and 2,067 had services concluded. This level of activity proved to be much higher than that experienced in previous years (i.e., 143.2% of 2009, 147.8% of 2008, 161.7% of 2007, and 170.4% of 2006), as a result of the midyear drop in daily caseload size as well as the economic instability and budgetary crisis currently evident in San Joaquin County.

Demographics of Clients:

Of the 1,882 clients referred to CEO as of December 31, 2010, 1,105 were in single-parent families (58.7%) and 767 in two-parent families (40.8%). The remaining ten were truant teens (0.5%), and by convention are not categorized as one- or two-parent.

In examining these findings, two comments must be made. First, the caseload at CEO was slightly below its optimal level (and contractual limit) of 1,100 clients on December 31, 2010. Given the unpredictable nature of referrals and de-registrations, the size of the overall caseload has historically fluctuated by up to 33 clients (i.e. 3.00%) at any given time. Being 9 clients below the optimal level at the end of the year was well within that acceptable level of tolerance.

Second, the notable tendency experienced in 2009 to receive more one-parent cases than two-parent significantly reversed itself in 2010. This appears to be the result of a more proper interpretation of the state regulations concerning the new exemption class, referred to as a Code NR exemption. CEO will likely continue to experience this trend for the next several years since this class of exemptions has been made permanent.

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Program Status

  • April 2, 2009

Client Demographics (data available through March 2009):)

Since January 2008, CEO has provided Welfare-to-Work services to an average of 1,143 clients per month. The turnover rate among clients has been relatively low at 12.5%, with an average of 142.9 clients entering and 141.4 clients departing each month.

As the attached tables describe in greater detail, approximately 60.9% of the clients are in one-parent families and 39.1% are in two-parent. The largest concentration of clients is Hispanic (27.8%), followed by Southeast Asian (25.7%), African American (20.6%), and Caucasian (19.6%). Only 3.6% of the clients described themselves as being unable to communicate in English. Approximately 23.6% of the clients entering CEO were employed, 19.2% participating in a County-approved activity, and 22.5% sanctioned. On average, 38.0% of the clients left CEO sanctioned, 17.3% exempted, 14.2% discontinued from cash aid, and 7.9% timed out.

Participation Rates (data available through December 2008):

One-Parent:

During 2008, the one-parent participation rate at CEO steadily rose from 21.02% in January to 33.03% in December. This represented a strong increase of 57%.

Two-Parent:

CEO began 2008 with a two-parent participation rate of 32.39% and ended with a rate of 31.01%, a slight drop of 4%. However, during the course of the year, the rate reached a high of 40.56% and never dropped below 31.01%.

Total:

The total participation rate for CEO climbed from 25.27% in January 2008 to 32.30% in December 2008, a significant rise of 28%. Throughout the course of the year, the rate reached a high of 34.10% and never fell below the annual low of 25.27%.

According to records maintained by CEO, the agency provided '0/TW services to an average of 1,202 clients per day from January 1, 2008 to February 29, 2008 (range of 1,183 to 1,211 clients). This number increased to a daily average of 1,229 over the period of Maq::h 1, 2008 to September 30, 2008 (range of 1,222 to 1,236 clients). Although the agreement to assist a larger number of clients ended September 30, 2008, HSA did not actual reduce the number of individuals referred to the agency. As a result, CEO served an average of 1,227 clients each day from October 1, 2008 to December 31, 2008 (range of 1,221 to 1,231 clients).

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2008 Annual Programmatic Report

  • 2008

Basic Staffing Pattern:

During CY 2008, the Center for Employment Opportunity (CEO) continued to be comprised of one Executive Director, one Program Director, one Bookkeeper, two Employment Training Supervisors, twelve Case Managers, and one Intake Worker. However, due to budgetary frugality, the program was able to add one part-time Case Manager from March 1, 2008 to September 30, 2008, splitting her time between a one-quarter active caseload and the CEO sanctioned caseload.

Aggregate Caseload Size:

As has been the case since CY 2007, CEO divides its caseload between active and sanctioned clients. Active clients are those individuals participating or striving to participate at or near the Minimum Participation Requirement (MPR) level mandated by the State and/or Federal authorities. Sanctioned clients are persons who refuse to engage in the WTW process and have had their Cash Award decreased or discontinued.

Active caseload:

The size of the aggregate active caseload at CEO changed slightly during CY 2008. In accordance with Contract A-06-748, CEO provided comprehensive Welfare-to-Work (WTW) services to a daily average of at least 1,200 recipients of Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) benefits residing in the greater Stockton area. However, by mutual agreement of the San Joaquin County Human Services Agency (HSA) and CEO, this number increased to 1,225 participants over the period of March 1, 2008 to September 30, 2008. Immediately thereafter, the agency caseload was anticipated to return to 1,200 clients and to continue at that level with the onset of Contract A-08-784, beginning November 1, 2008.

According to records maintained by CEO, the agency provided '0/TW services to an average of 1,202 clients per day from January 1, 2008 to February 29, 2008 (range of 1,183 to 1,211 clients). This number increased to a daily average of 1,229 over the period of Maq::h 1, 2008 to September 30, 2008 (range of 1,222 to 1,236 clients). Although the agreement to assist a larger number of clients ended September 30, 2008, HSA did not actual reduce the number of individuals referred to the agency. As a result, CEO served an average of 1,227 clients each day from October 1, 2008 to December 31, 2008 (range of 1,221 to 1,231 clients).

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Our Programs

Case Management Services

A county-based, public assistance program, the Center for Employment Opportunity (CEO) provides case management services to San Joaquin County CalWORKs' recipients.

Community Outreach

Assists members of the Southeast Asian (SEA) community of San Joaquin County to overcome their social and economic problems.

Family Self-Sufficiency

Assist local Hmong refugees in overcoming various social and mental health problems that hinder their ability to become independent and self-sufficient citizens of their local communities.

Food Program

Lao Khmu Association, Inc. sponsors a Food Program through which fresh, processed, and canned foodstuffs are made available to low-income residents in the greater Stockton area.